Commonly misspelled words

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commonly misspelled words English

commonly misspelled words
commonly misspelled words

commonly misspelled words are a  widely seen in the usage of English. When you find some errors in English sentences , we are not knowing how to correct them. This article will give you the basic idea about this. Know some of the commonly misspelled words.

commonly misspelled words, commonly misspelled words

discrepancy (singular) discrepancies (plural)

discribe

Wrong spelling. See DESCRIBE.

discribtion

Wrong spelling. See DESCRIPTION.

discription

Wrong spelling. See DESCRIPTION.

discuss

discussed, discussing

discussion

disease

diseased

See DECEASED OR DISEASED?.


dishevelled

disintegrate

(not disintergrate)

disinterested or uninterested?

Careful users would wish to preserve a distinction in meaning between these two words. Use the word DISINTERESTED to mean 'impartial, unselfish, acting for the good of others and not for yourself.

My motives are entirely DISINTERESTED; it is justice I am seeking.


Use UNINTERESTED to mean 'bored'.

His teachers say he is reluctant to participate and is clearly UNINTERESTED in any activities the school has to offer.

Originally, DISINTERESTED was used in this sense (= having no interest in, apathetic), and it is interesting that this meaning is being revived in popular speech.

Avoid this use in formal contexts, however, for it is widely perceived as being incorrect.


disiple

Wrong spelling. See DISCIPLE.

disk

See DISC OR DISK?.

displace or misplace?

To displace is to move someone or something from its usual place:

a DISPLACED hip; a DISPLACED person To misplace something is to put it in the wrong place (and possibly forget where it is):

a MISPLACED apostrophe; MISPLACED kindness dissappear Wrong spelling. See DISAPPEAR.


dissappoint

Wrong spelling. See DISAPPOINT.

dissapprove

Wrong spelling. See DISAPPROVE.

Dissatisfied

(dis + satisfied)

dissociate

See DISASSOCIATE OR DISSOCIATE?.

distroy

Wrong spelling. See DESTROY.


divers or diverse

The first is rarely used nowadays except jokingly or in mistake for the second.

DIVERS means 'several', 'of varying types': DIVERS reference books.

DIVERSE means 'very different': DIVERSE opinions,

DIVERSE interests.

does or dose?

DOES he take sugar? He DOES, (pronounced 'duz')

Take a DOSE of cough mixture every three hours.


doesn't

(not does'nt)

See CONTRACTIONS.

domino (singular) dominoes (plural)

See PLURALS (iv).

don't

(not do'nt)

See CONTRACTIONS.

dose

See DOES OR DOSE?.

double meaning

See AMBIGUITY.

double negatives

The effect of two negatives is to cancel each other out. This is sometimes done deliberately and can be effective:


I am not ungenerous. ( = 1 am very generous.)

He is not unintelligent. (= He is quite intelligent.)

Frequently, however, it is not intentional and the writer ends up saying the opposite of what is meant:

I haven't had no tea. ( = 1 have had tea.)

You don't know nothing. (= You know something.)

Be particularly careful with 'barely', 'scarcely', 'hardly'. These have a negative force.

I wasn't SCARCELY awake when you rang. ( = 1 was very awake.)

Be careful too with constructions like this:

I wouldn't be surprised if he didn't come.

Say either: I wouldn't be surprised if he came, or: I would be surprised if he didn't come.

Sometimes writers put so many negatives in a sentence that the meaning becomes too complicated to unravel:

Mr Brown denied vehemently that it was unlikely that no one would come to the concert.


Does Mr Brown think that the concert will be popular or not?

Rewrite as either: Mr Brown was certain the concert would be well attended.

Or: Mr Brown feared that no one would come to the concert.

doubling rule

See ADDING ENDINGS (i) and (iv).

doubt

(not dout)

The word is derived from the Latin word dubitare, to doubt. It may help you to remember that the

silent b is there.

Down's syndrome

(not Downe's)

downstairs

(one word)


draft or draught?

A DRAFT is a first or subsequent attempt at a piece of written work before it is finished.

A DRAUGHT is a current of cool air in a room.

One also refers to a DRAUGHT of ale, a game of DRAUGHTS and a boat having a shallow DRAUGHT.

drawers or draws?

DRAWS is a verb.

She DRAWS very well for a young child.

DRAWERS is a noun.

The DRAWERS of the sideboard are very stiff.

dreamed/dreamt

Both spellings are correct.


drier or dryer?

DRIER is generally used for the comparative form (DRIER = more dry).

DRYER is generally used for a drying machine (hair DRYER, clothes DRYER)

However, both spellings are interchangeable.

drunkenness

drunken + ness

dryness

(exception to the -y rule)

See ADDING ENDINGS (iii).

dual or duel?

DUAL means two (e.g. DUAL controls, DUAL carriageway).

DUEL means fight or contest.

duchess

(not dutchess)

due to/owing to

Strictly speaking, 'due to' should refer to a noun:

His absence was DUE TO sickness, (noun)

The delay was DUE TO leaves on the line, (noun) 'Owing to', strictly speaking, should refer to a verb:


The march was cancelled OWING TO the storm.

(verb)

OWING TO an earlier injury, he limped badly.

(verb)

However, in recent years, the use of 'due to' where traditionally 'owing to' would be required has become widespread. Nevertheless, some careful writers continue to preserve the distinction and you may wish to do so too in a formal context.

duel

See DUAL OR DUEL?.

duly

(not duely)

This is an exception to the magic -e rule.

See ADDING ENDINGS (ii).

dutchess

Wrong spelling. See DUCHESS.

dwelled/dwelt

Both spellings are correct.


dyeing or dying?

DYEING comes from the verb to dye.

She was DYEING all her vests green.

DYING comes from the verb to die.

She cursed him with her DYING breath.

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